Making Real the Moment

Interview

Interview (Photo credit: smiling_da_vinci)

I’ve always been able to daydream away my problems, at least for a little while.

One of my writer dreams since before I committed to actually writing (last year) … since my early twenties really … To have Oprah Winfrey select and use my work of fiction in her book club. Followed, of course, by an author interview on her show.

The only change to this dream over the years has been style related. As fashion changes so does what I’m wearing in my visualization.

Now that Oprah has moved on to do her OWN thing, I haven’t kept up with her shows or formats. I know she still does the book club but I don’t know the details.

As a result, my visualization has changed. The interviewer is faceless. The set is different. Again my outfit is different. But the one constant:  I arrive at this moment. In my mind I make real the moment of becoming a published writer, an author. Sought after. Movie rights sold.

So … out of my writer’s toolbox into yours, I give you visualization.

It helps when I get discouraged or feel inadequate or hit a wall and become blocked.

I imagine an interviewer asking me questions about the point in the story where I’m blocked. I imagine that the end result is so fabulous that people want to know how I pulled it off in my novel.

By answering the questions the interviewer asks, I work out solutions and overcome the writer’s block. In essence, I interview my way back to writing the story, back to momentum.

This may sound weird but I’m not the only one who uses such tactics. It comes in many forms.

For example, earlier this year I came across a blog where the author had a friend take his book jacket photo. It was a brooding black and white of the author. Artistic. Clever. I thought it was brilliant. This author was making real the moment. The moment of success and accomplishment.

I plan on doing this as one of my milestones. I love it.

Some writers I know print images to post in their writing spaces to represent their characters or their environments.

My writing partner sent me a picture of a Queen of Hearts Halloween costume. I’d just figured out who my villain would be and this image made her real. Dark hair and tanned skin, clothed in a red and black Elizabethan collar dress. She’s my Red Queen.

Another writing friend sent me a picture of cupcakes via Pinterest. How can you go wrong with an image of cupcakes? The cupcakes were decorated for an Alice in Wonderland theme party. Her note said, “This is how we’ll celebrate the completion of the first draft.”

Since my writing space is portable, I carry the images with me by pasting copies in my journal.

Both my writing partners in their own way were holding me accountable by making real my villain and finished draft. They were helping me visualize success of my WIP about what happens before and after Lewis Carroll’s works:  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.

And today, I stood in the mirror curling my hair thinking … How will I create the history for this story? How were The Few formed to protect the mirrors that lead to Wonderland?

I didn’t have answers. My reflection looked at me and shrugged. That’s when the interviewer showed up. Now I have some notes that will help me move the story along. Call me happy writer.

What’s in your writer’s toolbox? What tricks do you use to stay motivated to write or overcome writer’s block?

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Comments

  1. This is a really fantastic way to keep yourself motivated; I love the idea of an imaginary interview with Oprah to get you unstuck from writer’s block. I’ve also used the busy-book-signing visualization on occasion to remind me why I’m writing when I get caught up in writer’s block.

    • Thanks for stopping by Christi. I love your blog name. Visualization is important for my mental state. My self talk would quickly turn negative which would have me a writing standstill. This way back to writing is just a mirror away. I have visualized the book signing tour too. The interview makes me talk through my issues, the book signing is celebratory. 😉

  2. That. Was. Awesome!! I’m still practicing my Oprah questions. But I can’t ever see awesome clothes to go with it.

    And what I wonder now is this: when you looked into that mirror did you see a white rabbit waving to you? Did you want to jump through and follow him? Was there a little emblem on the top right corner?

    I think you’re on the right track….

    • Ms. S, you have NO idea how often Oprah and I chat about my wonderful novels. It just means I get stuck a lot. Now I need to finish one. 😉

      Nope. I didn’t see White Rabbit or the Red Queen. But Baby Girl is always top of mind. Maybe because there’s a little bit of me in her or there’s a little bit of her in me.

      And yes. I would love to walk through my looking glass and see I’d everything is backwards in my room.

      Have I told you the storyline for the prequel?

  3. You’ve got some great tips in this post. I also do the phantom interviewer tactics – but when I’m interviewed for real I tend to forget what I should be saying (but I’m getting better at it!) 😀

  4. Phil Hanson says:

    Oh, Gail. You are soooo going to do this! Great stuff here.

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