3 Writer’s Truths

Writer's Stop

Writer’s Stop (Photo credit: Stephh922)

I love how our experiences teach us the best lessons. I love how they shape us.

Over the past few weeks I’ve heard some interesting statements which have made me reflect on my writer life. These statements have led me to some new truths.

I want to share my new found knowledge with you. Forgive me if these are truths that you already carry around with you.

1. Knowing is half the battle.

I had the privilege of attending a motivational conference for work. One of the speakers said, “Know some stuff, so you can say some stuff.” Her topic was about meeting new people, striking up conversations with strangers.

My colleague and I were tickled by this assertion. Why? Because it’s obvious. To have something interesting to contribute to any conversation you have to know something.

I guess this is why some of the most frequent advice to writers is you should be readers especially in the genre you write. Reading is research. It helps you know stuff.

Another frequent piece of writer advice is write what you know. My recommendation … know some stuff, just as the speaker at this event said. Then you’ll have lots to say.

But equally important to remember, like in a conversation, is the other person knows something too. Your reader knows stuff. You don’t have to describe or explain everything because the readers’ experience can fill in gaps.

2. Boring is relative.

I listen to a few podcasts. On a recent episode of I Should Be Writing, the host was reading comments and questions from her listeners. One said, “My life isn’t interesting enough to blog about.” Hmmm.

Then I listened to an episode of Writing Excuses where the writing prompt was:  The Hero of the Most Boring Story Ever.

Both made me think of the Seinfeld phenomenon. A show about nothing that has a cult following.

Isn’t it the responsibility of the writer to help the reader connect to the content; to get them to feel something?

If our lives aren’t interesting or if we are the hero of the most boring story ever, it doesn’t matter. Boring is relative. We need to make them feel excited about what we perceive as boredom, just as Seinfeld writers accomplished.

My recommendation … write with abandon … write like what you have to say is the most important and exciting, interesting, wonderful story that needs telling. It’s your job.

3. Solitude produces the goods.

I recently added a new podcast to my list, The Introvert Entrepreneur. In this episode, they were explaining the differences between introversion and shyness. The guest quoted Carl Young, “…The introvert is usually happy alone with a rich imagination and prefers reflection to activity…”

This made me think of a cartoon that my mom-in-law sent me by Jason Love. The caption is:  “The writer:  Someone who spends a lifetime in solitude for the sake of communication.”

Sound like any writers you know? Maybe yourself. Definitely me.

Now … let me say that not all writers are introverts and not all introverts are shy … but it stands to reason that if introverts are recharged by their alone time that their best work would come during times of solitude.

My best writing ideas come when I am alone with my thoughts like curling my hair, taking a shower, doing the dishes or driving to work.

My recommendation … make solitude a priority if you want results. It can get your creative juices flowing.

So … these are my new truths. Maybe I’ve always known them but hadn’t categorized them. Either way I will be operating in truth.

What have your recent life experiences taught you? What new truths will you be exercising? Share the stuff you know in the comments and make it engaging!

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Comments

  1. Hello Gail!

    This is my first time in your blog and I really enjoy the tour! 🙂 This post is very interesting. I bookmarked the postcasts to listen to them in my spear time. I have to admit that many points of your post reminds me of me!

  2. I love the saying that a writer is “Someone who spends a lifetime in solitude for the sake of communication” – that’s it to a tee for me! These three are definitely writers truths. 😉

    • Thanks for reading Dianne. I like that line too. Especially since most of my writing happens after my dudes go to bed. I sit on the sofa with headphones on listening to Jazz and clicking on the keys. 😉

  3. If you enjoy the writing process itself I believe that this will transmit itself to the reader. Therefore if it’s just a grind, go and do something else.

  4. Making solitude a priority is a really good idea to get more done as a writer. Great post!

  5. As a dyed in the wool introvert, I enjoyed reading your the post.

Trackbacks

  1. […] 3 Writer’s Truths (thejottersjoint.com) […]

  2. […] 3 Writer’s Truths from The Jotter’s Joint The Jotter brings us some great thoughts she’s had about what she’s learning in her writing life. […]

  3. […] 3 Writer’s Truths (thejottersjoint.com) […]

  4. […] was reading a great post at the Jotter’s Joint earlier and it reminded me of something that happened recently […]

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